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We are ready with another maintenance release of Test Design Studio that brings a significant new feature. You can see the change notes and download now.

Run Code Analysis from the Command Line

This is a big one!  The Code Analysis functionality of Test Design Studio is perhaps the most important functionality in the tool, and this one little update opens up a world of new possibilities.  You can now trigger Test Design Studio to load a Project or Solution, analyze the code, and export the results… all from the command line without having to interact with the user interface!  Of particular interest, this should enable you to integrate Test Design Studio into your DevOps pipeline.

TestDesignStudio.exe "C:\TDS Solutions\MySolution.tdssln" -Analyze "C:\Results\MySolution.Analysis.csv"

The above loads a solution called “MySolution.tdssln” and outputs the analysis results to “MySolution.Analysis.csv”, a comma-separated values file.  This standard format can be opened in Excel or parsed by any number of 3rd-party solutions.

We started with CSV because that format was already supported by Test Design Studio using the File –> Export -> Excel option from the main menu, but more formats can be supported.  If you need a different format, please reach out and let us know what you are looking for.  If you have any challenges integrating Test Design Studio with your DevOps platform, we’re ready to work with you and make sure you get the functionality you need.

Naming Convention Rules Change

The naming conventions feature allows you to create a series of rules that are applied to named declarations in your code to make sure you are following a standard naming convention.  Use our built-in rules or create your own!  With this release, we changed how the “Matches” rule looks at regular expressions to ensure the expression fully matches the given term.  Previously, the ^ and $ characters were added to any pattern that did not include them to ensure a full match, but this caused issues with some alternation patterns.  Those characters are no longer added to your pattern and, instead, we now make sure that the length of the pattern match is the same as the name being verified.  Make sure any regular expressions you define will fully match the entire name to be successful.

If you are using our built-in rules, your files are automatically updated with this release.  If you copied our rules or created a new one of your own, make sure you look at the changes in the macro patterns we define in our rules so you apply the same to your own files.  If you modified the built-in files without copying them to a new location, your modifications will be overridden by this update.  Please make sure you are maintaining your edits outside of the application installation folder to avoid future overwrites.

Incremental Search

We always included an introduction to the Incremental Search feature in our getting started walk through, but it never had a dedicated help topic until now.  For those that skip the walkthrough, you might have missed out on this great productivity booster.  As a reminder for those who missed it, Incremental Search allows you to quickly and easily navigate to matching search terms in the document, all without removing your hands from the keyboard or loading a blocking UI element.

To begin Incremental Search, press the keyboard shortcut Ctlr+I to start searching forward, or Ctrl+Shift+I to start searching backwards. The status bar will then display “Incremental Search:” or “Reverse Incremental Search:” to match the shortcut you pressed.

With Incremental Search active, begin typing your search term. The characters you type will not be entered in the editor, but, instead, will be used to define the search. As each character is typed, Incremental Search will move the selection to the first match and the status bar will be updated to display your search term to help confirm what you have typed (e.g. “Incremental Search: MySearchTerm”). If at any point you have typed a term that is not matched in the text, the status bar will display “(not found)” after your search term.

Once you have defined your search term, you can easily navigate to all the matches for the same term. No matter whether your started with Ctrl+I or Ctrl+Shift+I, pressing Ctrl+I while Incremental Search is active will move forward to the next term, and Ctrl+Shift+I will move backwards to the previous term. Continue issuing either of these keyboard shortcuts to navigate through all the matched terms.

Incremental Search mode will be automatically cancelled if you change the selection with mouse or keyboard. You can manually cancel Incremental Search with the Esc key.

If you’ve never tried Incremental Search, you owe it to yourself to give it a shot.  Try performing Incremental Search for the term “dim” to quickly jump between all your declarations, or enter the name of a variable to cycle through all the places it appears in the file.  Once you see how easy it can be to perform these simple navigations, you’ll wonder who you ever lived without it. We put together a quick 2-min video highlighting the feature. Check it out!